Glossary

Cache Poisoning

Cache poisoning is a type of attack in which an attacker is able to inject malicious data into a cache, often a DNS cache. This can have serious consequences, as the injected data can be used to redirect traffic intended for legitimate websites to malicious ones, or to cause other types of disruptions.

Cache poisoning attacks typically work by exploiting vulnerabilities in the systems that are responsible for managing and updating the cache. For example, an attacker might send a large number of specially crafted requests to a DNS server, with the goal of overwhelming the server and causing it to cache the malicious data.

Cache poisoning attacks typically involve exploiting vulnerabilities in the systems that manage and update the cache, such as a DNS server or a content delivery network (CDN). There are several ways that an attacker might carry out a cache poisoning attack, including:

  1. Overwhelming the cache server with a large number of specially crafted requests, in an attempt to cause the server to cache the malicious data.
  1. Exploiting vulnerabilities in the cache server's software or configuration, in order to inject malicious data into the cache.
  1. Manipulating the network infrastructure or exploiting vulnerabilities in network devices, in order to redirect traffic intended for the cache server to a malicious server that is controlled by the attacker.

Once the malicious data has been injected into the cache, it can be very difficult to remove, as it will be served up to users whenever they request the corresponding resource. This can lead to serious security and reliability issues, as users may be unknowingly directed to malicious websites or may experience other types of disruptions.

To protect against cache poisoning attacks, it is important to ensure that systems that manage caches are properly configured and secured, and that they are kept up to date with the latest security patches and updates. Additionally, it may be necessary to implement additional measures, such as rate limiting or filtering, to help prevent malicious data from being injected into the cache.